• WORLD HISTORY 1450 - 1900

    This freshman history course will cover the years of 1450 – 1900 in a thematic nature incorporating society, history, and cultures from around the globe. Students will learn philosophies and ideas about how governments evolved and eventually led to the creation and expansion of American Democracy. Learning about the history of different societies through a thematic approach will allow students to make connections and see how events and trends are connected at the local, state, national, and global levels. Units of study include The Renaissance and Protestant Reformation, Age of World Exploration, Age of Absolutism, The Enlightenment, Global Revolutions (including the American Revolution), and the global spread of Nationalism.

    U.S. HISTORY 1

    This sophomore course will cover American history in a thematic nature incorporating important concurrent global events. The course will begin with a review of Revolutionary America and cover major historical themes such as slavery, civil war, imperialism, immigration, industrialization, and struggles for democracy and equality. Learning about the history of our nation through a thematic approach will allow students to make connections and see how events and trends are connected at the local, state, national, and global levels. Major assessments include an independent research paper, group and individual projects, and various types of class presentations.

    U.S. HISTORY 2

    This junior course includes a comprehensive study of the growth and development of the United States since 1877, stressing political, economic, cultural, and social changes. Topics will include industrialization, the age of reform, imperialism, World War I, America between the World Wars, World War II, foreign policy and America since World War II, the Civil Rights Movement, Vietnam War, and Watergate. Major assessments include a research paper and numerous individual and group projects.

    ADVANCED PLACEMENT® U.S. HISTORY

    Advanced Placement Courses provide an opportunity for students to experience a college course while still in high school. AP courses follow a syllabus that has been approved by the College Board, and teachers must receive specialized training to teach the courses. Although it is not required, it is expected that students who take AP courses will also register for the national AP exam at their own expense. This course is organized as a survey of United States history. Students will improve their analytical skills and will be expected to make use of a variety of supplementary reading materials, while writing essays. This course is fast-paced and involves considerable textbook reading and note-taking. Reading selections include Enduring Voices. This course meets the Grade 11 social studies requirement when taken as a junior.