• CERAMICS 1

    This course is open to students who have completed Foundations of Art. The Foundations of Art requirement can only be waived through portfolio review. Students in Ceramics 1 will explore three-dimensional design using clay as the medium, with an emphasis on the fundamentals of formation, surface design, and glaze applications. Students will create both functional and decorative sculptural pieces through traditional hand-building techniques (pinch, slab, coil, and press/drape molds) with a focus on technique and craftsmanship. Learning will occur within the context of art history/culture and criticism. Students will be required to know and use art and ceramics terminology; maintain a sketchbook for drawing practice and project planning activities; complete homework assignments, and conduct research.

    CERAMICS 2

    This course is open to students who have completed Ceramics 1. This course continues the progressive development of technical skills learned in Ceramics 1 with a focus on advanced hand-building techniques and introduction to wheel-throwing. Students will be expected to demonstrate initiative, commitment, and experimentation with an emphasis on the development of personal style. Students will explore conceptual problem-solving through more involved and complex assignments, and will experiment with slips, resists, and layered finishing techniques. Learning will occur within the context of art history/culture and criticism. Students will berequired to know and use art and ceramics terminology; maintain a sketchbook for drawing practice and project planning activities; complete homework assignments, and conduct research.

    CERAMICS: WHEEL THROWING

    This course is open to students who completed Ceramics I, and is dedicated to working strictly on the pottery wheel. Students will learn processes of wheel throwing including: preparing and centering the clay, basic throwing skills to make a variety of functional & decorative forms (bowls, mugs, pitchers, vases, plates, etc), approaches to altering and combining forms, trimming techniques, and working with various surface decorations/glaze applications. Learning will occur through demonstrations and critiques (individual and group), and within the context of art history/culture, and criticism. Students will be required to know and use art and ceramics terminology; maintain a sketchbook for drawing practice and project planning activities; complete homework assignments; and conduct research. This course can be repeated for credit for students willing to work at a more challenging pace.